Photographer Issued Summons for ‘Loitering’ at LaGuardia

 Photographer Angus Mordant was charged with loitering after he took photographs of a police action in the entrance to LaGuardia Airport Terminal D in September. He appeared in Queens Criminal Court Tuesday. Photos courtesy of Angus Mordant

Photographer Angus Mordant was charged with loitering after he took photographs of a police action in the entrance to LaGuardia Airport Terminal D in September. He appeared in Queens Criminal Court Tuesday. Photos courtesy of Angus Mordant

By David Brand

A freelance photographer on assignment at LaGuardia Airport was issued a court summons by Port Authority Police for “loitering” after he photographed a law enforcement team rushing through an entrance to the airport, prosecutors said.

Angus Mordant had finished photographing the arrival of former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull for an Australian newspaper when he noticed the team of police officers rushing toward Terminal D shortly after 9 p.m. on Sept. 2.

Mordant parked his car in the arrivals area and was issued a parking ticket, according to court documents. He said he did not dispute the ticket — though he has press plates issued by the NYPD — and paid the fine.

Port Authority Police approached Mordant and told him he should have contacted their office before photographing a breaking news event like a spur-of-the-moment police action in a public area of the airport. Mordant did not enter the airport to take the photographs and instead took the photos through glass windows.

“Taking photographs and video of things that are plainly visible in public spaces is a constitutional right — and that includes transportation facilities, the outside of federal buildings and police and other government officials carrying out their duties,” according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

Mordant appeared in Queens Criminal Court Tuesday for a desk appearance before Judge Phyllis Flug. He is charged with loitering or remaining “in any transportation facility, unless specifically authorized to do so, for the purpose of soliciting or engaging in any business, trade or commercial transactions involving the sale of merchandise or services, or for the purpose of entertaining persons by singing, dancing or playing any musical instrument.”

As of press time, the Port Authority did not provide comment.