City Breaks Ground on Southeast Queens Anti-Flooding Projects

 Workers from the Department of Design and Construction prepare to install new sewer systems through southeast Queens. Photo courtesy of DDC.

Workers from the Department of Design and Construction prepare to install new sewer systems through southeast Queens. Photo courtesy of DDC.

By David Brand

The city is moving forward with its $1.9 billion commitment to prevent flooding in Southeast Queens, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Department of Design and Construction (DDC) announced Wednesday.

“Shovels in the ground in southeast Queens mean we are one step closer to a true drainage system and some peace of mind for residents and businesses,” said DEP Commissioner Vincent Sapienza. “As we complete each of these projects we will see better drainage, safer roadways, a healthier Jamaica Bay and higher property values across these long underserved neighborhoods.”

The city said it has so far allocated about 20 percent of the project funding to 10 completed projects with another 10 underway.

Upgraded sewer systems are being installed in St. Albans, Rosedale, Jamaica, Laurelton and Springfield Gardens.

“Many parts of southeast Queens experience significant flooding and ponding issues that can linger for days after a heavy rainfall,” said DDC Commissioner Lorraine Grillo. “We’re very happy to enjoy the support of the Mayor and to work with our partners at DEP to implement the largest systematic street restoration program in the five boroughs.”

The bulk of the funding will go to the construction of large trunk sewer spines along 150th Street, Guy Brewer Boulevard, Farmers Boulevard and Springfield Boulevard.

“The lack of a comprehensive drainage system has plagued residents of Southeast Queens for far too long. Ground water flooding and heavy rainfall have cost them thousands of dollars worth of damage on their homes and businesses,” said Assembly Member Alicia Hyndman. “With upgraded pipes and water mains, residents will no longer have to live in fear of the next storm.”