CUNY Queens College Breaks Barriers with First-Ever Woman Security Director

By Victoria Merlino

The first woman ever to serve as campus security director at a senior City University of New York college was recently appointed at Queens College.

Dr. Beth A. LaManna was a special agent for 22 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the Criminal Division at the New York Field Office, conducting investigations around organized crime, financial fraud, the 9/11 attacks and civil rights violations.

 Dr. Beth A. LaManna is a former FBI agent and holds a doctorate in educational and clinical psychology. Photo courtesy of Andy Poon with CUNY Queens College.

Dr. Beth A. LaManna is a former FBI agent and holds a doctorate in educational and clinical psychology. Photo courtesy of Andy Poon with CUNY Queens College.

Dr. LaManna joined Queens College’s staff on Oct. 1.

“Public safety plays an increasingly significant role on our college campuses today,” Dr. LaManna told the Eagle. “I am excited and am looking forward to working with our professional and extremely competent Public Safety team at Queens College to ensure a safe and secure campus for students, faculty, staff and visitors to enjoy.”

LaManna also holds a master’s degree in School and Community Psychology and a doctorate in Educational and Clinical Psychology from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. While there, Dr. LaManna gave clinical counseling and services to Detroit public schools for almost 10 years. She also maintained a private practice, and taught graduate psychology courses at her alma mater.

“We are delighted and proud to welcome Dr. LaManna to Queens College,” Queens College President Felix V. Matos Rodríguez said in a statement issued on Oct. 12. “Her combined background in law enforcement and educational, clinical and community psychology is uniquely suited to the role of security director in a senior college environment.”

Dr. LaManna also served as the coordinator for the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime were she coordinated and orchestrated training that focused on active school shooters, threat assessment mitigation and management, and violence in the workplace, according to the university’s press release.

Queens College has over 19,000 students and in 80-acre campus in Flushing. In 2017, the college saw 93 reported instances of wrongdoing, including two rapes, five motor vehicle thefts and 58 liquor law violation referrals, according to the college’s annual security and fire safety report.